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W3C (World Wide Web Consortium)

by Steve Dougan


Summary : The World Wide Web Consortium was founded by the inventor of the Web, Tim Berners-Lee in October, 1994. The definition of the World Wide Web Consortium is stated on their website at http://www.w3.org/Consortium/ and reads, "The World Wide Web consortium was created in October 1994 to lead the World Wide Web to its full potential by developing common protocols that promote its evolution and ensure its interoperability. W3C has around 400 Member organizations from all over the world and has earned international recognition for its contributions to the growth of the Web."

The World Wide Web Consortium was founded by the inventor of the Web, Tim Berners-Lee in October, 1994. The definition of the World Wide Web Consortium is stated on their website at http://www.w3.org/Consortium/ and reads, "The World Wide Web consortium was created in October 1994 to lead the World Wide Web to its full potential by developing common protocols that promote its evolution and ensure its interoperability. W3C has around 400 Member organizations from all over the world and has earned international recognition for its contributions to the growth of the Web."

The W3C team consists on more than 60 engineers and researchers from around the world. Most of the team works directly at the host institutions of MIT/LCS in the United States, ERCIM headquarters in France and Keio University in Japan).

The funding for their efforts comes primarily from member organizations and to a lesser degree, public funds. This allows the W3C to maintain vendor neutrality and work in an environment of consensus when resolving issues or making decisions.

The desire and wish of the all the members of the consortium is to ensure that no individual body has control over the web. This will enable open discussion of the course that the web follows long into the future and will allow for the growth of the web to be directed by the needs of a variety of cultures and peoples from around the world.

The W3C doesn't make rules or govern the Web, but it does create standards that are recommended to be used in the development of software and hardware devices. These recommendations are highly respected due to the nature of how the recommendations for standards are developed. As such the very specifications of the web's languages and protocols are compatible with one another allowing them to work together anywhere in the world.

To learn more about the work the W3C does, visit them at http://www.w3.org . The W3C has open access to anyone, anywhere, interested in the long term life of the Web.