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Articles & Tutorials

A Model's Shoot

by Gary Bernstein


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Summary : I get quite a few emails every month asking for tips on shooting a model's composite or ZED card. Let's look at a shoot I did for a young model-actress recently by the name of Casey Williams.

I get quite a few emails every month asking for tips on shooting a model's composite or ZED card. Let's look at a shoot I did for a young model-actress recently by the name of Casey Williams. It was her very first photo-session ever, and I will take you through the entire process a step at a time-to be continued in my next column.

I rented a studio in L.A. and hired the best hair and makeup in the country (truly) in the persona of talented Jeff Jones. Jeff has made me look good for about 20 years-maybe more-but neither of us will admit it. All the shots were made in and around the studio-using the studio elements as a backdrop and as props. Let's go through the session from the start...

Casey Williams
1. 2.

All the shots were made with a 6 mp camera and a short telephoto lens. I shot jpgs at E.I. 1600 and used hot lights for the entire session.

Most subjects are up tight before the first shot-and certainly before the first session! I don't know if that was the situation with Casey, because she worked the camera like a pro from the onset...but I always try to loosen up the subject by cranking some film (or whatever you call it when you're shooting digital). Why? Because it relaxes the subject and lets her know 1-how easy and fun it's going to be and 2-that we're going to be taking a lot of pictures so there's no reason to feel any pressure.

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